Balanced Large Scale Knowledge Matching Using LSH Forest

Authors: Michael, Cochez; Vagan, Terziyan; Vadim, Ermolayev
Year: 2015
Venue: In: J. Cardoso, F. Guerra, G.-J. Houben, A.M. Pinto, Y. Velegrakis (Eds.), Semantic Keyword-based Search on Structured Data Sources, LNCS 9398, Springer, pp. 36-50.
Link: http://download.springer.com/static/pdf/168/chp%253A10.1007%252F978-3-319-27932-9_4.pdf?originUrl=http%3A%2F%2Flink.springer.com%2Fchapter%2F10.1007%2F978-3-319-27932-9_4&token2=exp=1460991346~acl=%2Fstatic%2Fpdf%2F168%2Fchp%25253A10.1007%25252F978-3-319-27932-9_4.pdf%3ForiginUrl%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Flink.springer.com%252Fchapter%252F10.1007%252F978-3-319-27932-9_4*~hmac=21a89a3dd5b7a58029fdd881b5c796bfd9959ff84e59f8c8f75102233c3a37c6
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Abstract:
Evolving Knowledge Ecosystems were proposed recently to approach the Big Data challenge, following the hypothesis that knowledge evolves in a way similar to biological systems. Therefore, the inner working of the knowledge ecosystem can be spotted from natural evolution. An evolving knowledge ecosystem consists of Knowledge Organisms, which form a representation of the knowledge, and the environment in which they reside. The environment consists of contexts, which are composed of so-called knowledge tokens. These tokens are ontological fragments extracted from information tokens, in turn, which originate from the streams of information flowing into the ecosystem. In this article we investigate the use of LSH Forest (a self-tuning indexing schema based on locality-sensitive hashing) for solving the problem of placing new knowledge tokens in the right contexts of the environment. We argue and show experimentally that LSH Forest possesses required properties and could be used for large distributed set-ups.